Walking. & Talking

<first posted in early February>

Walking.

& talking.

These are the main ways I figure stuff out. (Writing too, of course.)

Couple apt quotes, right off the top:

“All truly great thoughts are conceived while walking.” – Friedrich Nietzsche

“It is solved by walking.” – St. Augustine

“People with self-respect have a kind of moral nerve. The willingness to accept responsibility for one’s own life – is the source from which self-respect springs.” – Joan Dideon (quoted in Failure to Communicate – How Conversations Go Wrong & What You Can Do to Right Them, by Holly Weeks)

 “All great spirituality is about what we do with our pain. If we do not transform our pain, we will transmit it to those around us.” – Richard Rohr

“Many of the things we all struggle with in love and work can be helped by conversation. Without conversation, studies show that we are less empathic, less connected, less creative and fulfilled. We are diminished, in retreat.” – from Reclaiming Conversation – The Power of Talk in a Digital Age, by Sherry Turkle

“People think that because it’s common for families to break up, children must weather it okay, but I don’t think they do. I work with families for a living, and for their sake and for mine I’ve held out against the idea that breakups are apocalyptic―but they are. For children, it’s an atom bomb going off, no matter how tactfully parents manage it. Family life, whatever the quality, is the medium children live in. They’re not separate from it. An individual self that can prevail, that can withstand change and loss, is a wobbly construct at the best of times. It’s theoretical or, if it exists at all, must come sometime later. Maybe by middle age we have a self. In a child it doesn’t exist. A child has no skin. When the adults come asunder, the child does too. They just do. I know this mournfulness in [her daughter].” – from Starting Out in the Afternoon – a Mid-Life Journey into Wild Land, by Jill Frayne

“..gaze bemused when our children are ripped almost crazy when we separate.” – Dr. Martin Shaw, in the foreword to Die Wise – A Manifesto for Sanity and Soul, by Stephen Jenkinson

“If a thing is never spoken between people who know each other well, and each knows the thing well, maybe it’s not a secret. …. It’s a powerful thing, that ability to tell the truth when the truth is upon you, but it has another power entirely when you don’t tell it.” – Stephen Jenkinson in Die Wise – A Manifesto for Sanity and Soul

“If you can’t say something, you can’t see it either.” – Stephen Jenkinson in Die Wise – A Manifesto for Sanity and Soul

I’m currently reading a book called Reclaiming Conversation – The Power of Talk in a Digital Age, by Sherry Turkle … having ever-so-fortunately caught an interview with the author that totally intrigued & resonated for me (& sent me off to get hold of the book!).

Ms. Turkle is laying out very clearly in the book how it is that we’ve come to a point where people are fast losing (or have already lost) not just an awareness of the art and value of conversation – but even the ability to conduct one.

Oh dear!

I have to say, this is uncomfortably familiar turf for me.

I am well acquainted with a person or two not, shall we say, "much for" conversation. They just don’t seem to have a real grasp of its extraordinary value.


Given how well I understand the true, deep value of conversation, I find this not just personally inconvenient (though it is most assuredly that), but also deeply disturbing.

 

A lot is being lost. By all of us.

 

Sigh.

 

Dang.

 

Janet

 

p.s. if you want to see a film that beautifully illustrates how important conversation is to true collaboration in the work (or any?) place, see ‘Spotlight.

p.p.s. more walking quotes here

 

‘Quote of the day’: “Many of the things we all struggle with in love and work can be helped by conversation. Without conversation, studies show that we are less empathic, less connected, less creative and fulfilled. We are diminished, in retreat.” – from Reclaiming Conversation – The Power of Talk in a Digital Age, by Sherry Turkle