Molasses

<July 15/13.> Does everyone know what molasses is?

That dark, super-gooey, super-sticky stuff I used to put in ginger cookies … back when I used to do things like baking ginger cookies (& muffins) & making hearty healthy meals every day for my family. Back in those simpler days, that Susie-Q Homemaker phase that was truly quite delightful and … really rather innocent (& oh, so very very long ago, now).

Different thoughts about molasses, now.

Occasionally I have times when the frustrations of life – or maybe just the challenges of a particular set of circumstances – put me in mind of trying to walk through a gymnasium a foot deep in molasses.

You work soooo hard just to pick up one of your feet, out of the muck – only to have to put it down seconds later in another patch of the darn gooey muck.

Supremely frustrating. Or just … hmmm. Challenging?

Brings you into the present moment, for sure. The molasses is making you be exactly & only here, right where you are.

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Molasses can also be an image for the way some people’s minds are so mired in the past.

(This is all of us to some degree, of course. Some much more so than others, too.)

& then too, an argument in the present – can suddenly throw us back into the (very) distant past – with lightning speed.

Suddenly, two adults are really unconscious 5-year olds – filled with righteous (& wildly out of proportion) anger that was actually forged decades (& decades) ago – in a different world altogether.

(Been there, been there, been there.)

And, as I’ve been known to say wryly, nothing good happens once the shouting starts.

[Margaret Atwood said “War is what happens when language fails.”]

Molasses.

I think I’d rather have it keep me in the here & now, than mired back in the long-ago, distant & utterly irretrievable, pretty much now-irrelevant past.

… or maybe just use it for baking cookies.

(As if, eh??)

Janet

p.s. I wrote another molasses-y post several years ago now. It’s called ‘Near Death Experience.’ I think that was when I began using the molasses analogy.

‘Quote of the day’ with this post: “It is the only thing we can do, Klaas, I see no alternative, each of us must turn inward and destroy in himself all that he thinks he ought to destroy in others.” – Etty Hillesium, on her way to her death, at 29, in Auschwitz, quoted in The Open Road – The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, by Pico Iyer, 2008.

+++ relevant quote: “There is only one courage, and that is the courage to go on dying to the past. Not to collect it, not to accumulate it, not to cling to it. We all cling to the past, and because we cling to it we become unavailable to the present.” – Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh

[plenty more quotes about courage here